Cellular Dynamics claims patents on making stem cells from blood

feature2Cellular Dynamics, a resident company of University Research Park, has secured three patents on making stem cells from blood.

These patents are added to a Cellular Dynamics portfolio of more than 800 issued and pending patents since the company was founded in 2004.

Cellular Dynamics claims patents on making stem cells from blood

By Jeff Engel, Xconomy

Cellular Dynamics International has already situated itself as an early leader—if not the leader—in large-scale manufacturing of human cells from induced pluripotent stem cells. Today the company says it has strengthened its market position with three new patents related to making stem cells from human blood samples.

Madison, WI-based Cellular Dynamics (NASDAQ: ICEL) says it has accumulated a portfolio of more than 800 issued and pending patents since the company was founded in 2004 by University of Wisconsin-Madison biologist James Thomson, who derived the first human embryonic stem cell line in 1998.

Thomson and his research team are among a small handful of scientists around the world who have worked to reprogram adult human cells into an embryonic-like state, creating what’s called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS). The iPS cells can then be coaxed into various types of functioning cells, including neurons, heart and liver cells, and the cells that line blood vessels. Read more …

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