Miron Livny, a University of Wisconsin-Madison computer science professor, is pictured near an enclosed bank of distributed computing equipment in the Computer Sciences and Statistics building on July 28, 2008. The facility includes 1,100 CPU cores and nearly 400 terabytes of disk space, all connected directly to the backbone of the campus network. Livny specializes in distributed computing, which pools the computing power of thousands of processors to conduct number crunching at a huge scale. Livny leads a national initiative, called the Open Science Grid, that uses this ability to collect and divide data from the particle detector project at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Switzerland.
©UW-Madison University Communications 608/262-0067
Photo by: Jeff Miller
Date:  07/08    File#:  NIKON D3 digital frame 7196

UW System researchers played role in Nobel-winning gravitational wave discovery

October 3, 2017 By Jennifer Smith

Today’s announcement of the Nobel Prize in Physics, awarded to researchers Rainer Weiss of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Kip Thorne and Barry Barish of the California Institute of Technology, bears University of Wisconsin System connections.

The three researchers led an extensive international team, known as the LIGO Scientific Collaboration, that discovered ripples in space-time called gravitational waves. The existence of such waves was predicted by Einstein a century ago.

University of Wisconsin–Madison and University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee researchers played a role in this “discovery that shook the world,” as the Royal Swedish Academy called it. UW–Madison’s contributions have been on the computing side, and UW–Milwaukee’s on physics and computing.

READ FULL STORY

Comments are closed.

Facebook IconYouTube IconTwitter IconVisit Our LinkedIn Profile