UW-Madison joins national leaders to discuss plan to promote high-tech growth
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UW-Madison joins national leaders to discuss plan to promote high-tech growth

UW-Madison joins national leaders to discuss plan to promote high-tech growth

The University Research Park on Madison’s west side is home to Exact Sciences and other innovative companies. A recent report lauded Madison’s high-technology growth. PHOTO: BRYCE RICHTER

The University Research Park on Madison’s west side is home to Exact Sciences and other innovative companies. A recent report lauded Madison’s high-technology growth. PHOTO: BRYCE RICHTER

Leaders from Madison and other high-growth centers across the heartland gathered Jan. 29 to discuss proposals to spread high-technology growth more equitably across the nation.

The conference, Boosting growth across more of America, grew from a Dec. 9 report from the non-profit Brookings Institution that identified Madison and nine other cities beyond the coasts with track records of growth and potential for much more.

“We are here to build on success, to accelerate the growth of high-paying industries that are propelling Madison, and a select group of other cities,” said conference participant Benjamin Miller, assistant vice chancellor for government and corporate affairs at UW–Madison.  “In its report last month, Brookings placed Madison at the top of its list of growth centers that, with some more federal help, could start to rival the innovation-heavy coastal cities.”

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